Press Release For Immediate Release 

Event Date: June 9, 2013 – June 9, 2014

First Exhibition Ever on a Woman- Elizabeth Bonaparte- The Grace Kelly of 1812 Era

Known as ‘the Notorious Belle of Baltimore,’ socialite and landowner Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte was an important female figure in 1812 society.

 

 

Baltimore, Maryland, May 15, 2013 - The Maryland Historical Society presents “Woman of Two Worlds:” Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte and Her Quest for an Imperial Legacy, an exhibition that brings 1812 Baltimore vividly to life. With hundreds of objects and reams of documents, the Maryland Historical Society is the official keeper of Elizabeth’s memories. On view from June 9, 2013 – June 9, 2014, the “Woman of Two Worlds:” Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte and Her Quest for an Imperial Legacy exhibit marks the first time the Maryland Historical Society has featured a exhibition exclusively devoted to a historical female figure. Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte was one of the femme fatales of the War of 1812 generation. As a gorgeous 18-year-old, Elizabeth set the gossipmongers atwitter with her revealing empire dresses at society events. Her marriage to Napoleon Bonaparte’s younger brother Jerome became an international drama. Even at ninety-four, Elizabeth was still making news as one of America’s richest and most beautiful women. Museum hours, 201 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, are Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission is $9 for adults. More information www.mdhs.org or 410-685-3750.

 

The Dramatic Life of Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte

Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte, born in Baltimore in 1785, was the oldest daughter of thirteen children. Her father was William Patterson, an Irish shipping merchant and one of the wealthiest men in Maryland. Elizabeth attended Madame Lacombe’s Academy and studied history, culture, mathematics and French, a skill that would later prove useful. She grew into a great beauty — a woman of dainty stature and an ivory complexion and a celebrated bosom. Her taste for the latest European fashions inspired her to wear gowns considered risqué by American standards.

Portrait of Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte at 19. Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte (1785-1879), Gilbert Stuart (1755-1828),1804. Private Collection.  

 


 Contact & Media Visits  


Maryland Historical Society

Baltimore, Maryland

Web: www.mdhs.org

 

Media Contact: Marc Apter

Email: marca1030@gmail.com

Phone: (301) 904-3690

 


 Condensed Version  


First Exhibition Ever on a Woman- Elizabeth Bonaparte- The Grace Kelly of 1812 Era

 

Baltimore, Maryland, May 15, 2013 - The Maryland Historical Society presents Woman of Two Worlds:” Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte and Her Quest for an Imperial Legacy, an exhibition that brings 1812 Baltimore vividly to life. With hundreds of objects and reams of documents, the Maryland Historical Society is the official keeper of Elizabeth’s memories. On view from June 9, 2013 – June 9, 2014, the “Woman of Two Worlds:” Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte and Her Quest for an Imperial Legacy exhibit marks the first time the Maryland Historical Society has featured a exhibition exclusively devoted to a historical female figure. Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte was one of the femme fatales of the War of 1812 generation. As a gorgeous 18-year-old, Elizabeth set the gossipmongers atwitter with her revealing empire dresses at society events. Her marriage to Napoleon Bonaparte’s younger brother Jerome became an international drama. Even at ninety-four, Elizabeth was still making news as one of America’s richest and most beautiful women. Museum hours, 201 W. Monument Street, Baltimore, are Wednesday through Sunday 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Admission is $9 for adults. More information www.mdhs.org or 410-685-3750.

 

The Dramatic Life of Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte

Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte, born in Baltimore in 1785, was the oldest daughter of thirteen children. Her father was William Patterson, an Irish shipping merchant and one of the wealthiest men in Maryland. Elizabeth attended Madame Lacombe’s Academy and studied history, culture, mathematics and French, a skill that would later prove useful. She grew into a great beauty — a woman of dainty stature and an ivory complexion and a celebrated bosom. Her taste for the latest European fashions inspired her to wear gowns considered risqué by American standards.