Press Release

For Immediate Release 

 

Event Date: July, 2017:

(two one-week long free workshop sessions (July 9 through July 14, and July 23 through July 28, 2017)

 

“African Americans in the Making of Early New England,” Summer Workshop for Teachers, Deerfield, MA

 

Teachers from around the nation are invited to submit applications to study in depth the significant role of African Americans  in the birthplace of American freedom and in the rise of the greater New England region as the earliest commercial power and cultural trade center in British North America. The Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association of  Old Deerfield, MA, one of New England’s oldest history museums, will host two one-week long free workshop sessions, open to K-12 educators and librarians in public and private schools,  and home school educators.

 

 

 

 

 

Deerfield, Massachusetts, February 13, 2017 - “African Americans in the Making of early New England,” is the focus of a National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for Teachers held in  Deerfield, Massachusetts in July 2017,  now accepting applications from around the country.
 
Teachers from around the nation are invited to submit applications to study in depth the significant role of African Americans  in the birthplace of American freedom and in the rise of the greater New England region as the earliest commercial power and cultural trade center in British North America. The Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association of  Old Deerfield, MA, one of New England’s oldest history museums, will host two one-week long free workshop sessions (July 9 through July 14, and July 23 through July 28, 2017), open to K-12 educators and librarians in public and private schools,  and home school educators. The location is
Deerfield Teachers' Center, 10 Memorial St., Deerfield, MA 01342. Deadline for applications is March 1, 2017. Go to: http://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org
 
The workshops, entitled “African Americans in the Making of Early New England,” are led by leading historians including  Dr. Joanne Melish, Dr. Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina, Dr. Richard A. Bailey, Dr. Jared R. Hardesty, and Dr. Thomas Doughton, as well as members of the Deerfield Teachers’ Center and Historic Deerfield, Inc. staff. In addition to lectures and discussions with scholars, the activities include field excursions to other museums of the period interpreting African Americans, including the Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, Massachusetts .
 
The workshops are free of charge and participants will receive a $600 to $1200 stipend to help offset expenses. Professional Development Points or CEU's are also awarded. Each week is limited to 36 participants. Workshop details and application information are available at:
http://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org. Applications must be postmarked by March 1st. Questions about the application process or the workshop should be directed to Lynne Manring 413-774-7476 x330 or lmanring@deerfield.history.museum.
 
“Through this workshop, teachers will discover roles played—economic, religious, cultural-- of  African Americans, free and enslaved, in creating New England ,” according to Tim Neumann, Executive Director of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association. “At a time when fostering cross-racial understanding in American society couldn’t be more important, it is still the case that many American students learn very little, if anything, about the many significant roles played by African Americans. What students learn about early American life is mostly about white families; yet the trade in African captives undergirded New England’s maritime commercial development, and African Americans in slavery and freedom made essential contributions to early New England life as artisans and laborers, poets and writers, soldiers and ministers. Knowing this history is crucial to understanding evolving ideas about race in the United States, and it informs  the narrative of America’s expanding commitment to social justice and equality. Indeed, learning about each other’s history is key to building cross-racial and cross-cultural understanding today, and the best place to do that is in K-12 classrooms.”


“Deerfield, Massachusetts, the site of a well-known  French and Indian raid in February 1704, may seem at first glance to be an unlikely place to serve as the center of a study of early African American life, adds Neumann “ but in fact Deerfield exemplifies both the range of experiences of African Americans in New England and the troubling effacement of their history: in Deerfield, enslaved and free African American labor was widespread and essential in the colonial period, it had been virtually forgotten by 1900, and is little- known today. Two of the nearly 150 Deerfield residents killed and captured in the famous 1704 raid were enslaved Africans; altogether, more than fifty-five enslaved Africans and forty-five emancipated slaves lived and worked in Deerfield between 1695 and 1783, a town whose population never exceeded 2,000 people before 1840. On Old Main Street in the village of Deerfield, there are 23 historic sites where enslaved and free African Americans lived, worked, worshipped, and are buried. In one of these sites, the Wells-Thorn House, Lucy Terry Prince, poet and author of the first known work of African American literature, lived as the slave of Ebenezer Wells for about twenty years."

 

A rich array of archival materials documenting the lives of the African Americans living in early Deerfield has been assembled and will be available to workshop participants through the Memorial Hall Museum of the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association and Historic Deerfield, Inc.

 

http://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org

 

Web: www.deerfield-ma.org, Phone: (413) 774-7476

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massachusetts, Deerfield, Event Date: July, 2017

“African Americans in the Making of Early New England,” Summer Workshop for Teachers, Deerfield, MA

“African Americans in the Making of early New England,” is the focus of a National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for Teachers held in  Deerfield, Massachusetts in July 2017,  now accepting applications from around the country.   Teachers from around the nation are invited to submit applications to study in depth the significant role of African Americans  in the birthplace of American freedom ...

 

 

 Media Contact    

 

Media Contact: Tim Neumann

Email: tneumann@deerfield.history.museum

Phone: (413) 774-7476

 

OR: Lynne Manring  413-774-7476 Ext. 330, lmanring@deerfield.history.museum

 

Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association

Deerfield, Massachusetts

Web: www.deerfield-ma.org

 

 Calendar Listing

 

CALENDAR LISTING:

Event Name: African Americans in the Making of New England applications

Event Date: July, 2017: two one-week long free workshop sessions (July 9 through July 14, and July 23 through July 28, 2017)

Event Location: Deerfield Teachers' Center, 10 Memorial St., Deerfield, MA 01342

Admission: The workshops are free of charge and participants will receive a $600 to $1200 stipend to help offset expenses.

Web: www.deerfield-ma.org

Contact: Tim Neumann, tneumann@deerfield.history.museum, (413) 774-7476

Description:  “African Americans in the Making of early New England,” is the focus of a National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops for Teachers held in  Deerfield, Massachusetts in July 2017,  now accepting applications from around the country. Teachers from around the nation are invited to submit applications to study in depth the significant role of African Americans  in the birthplace of American freedom and in the rise of the greater New England region as the earliest commercial power and cultural trade center in British North America. The Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association of  Old Deerfield, MA, one of New England’s oldest history museums, will host two one-week long free workshop sessions (July 9 through July 14, and July 23 through July 28, 2017), open to K-12 educators and librarians in public and private schools,  and home school educators.  Deadline for applications is March 1, 2017. Go to: http://afram-workshop.deerfield-ma.org   The workshops, entitled “African Americans in the Making of Early New England,” are led by leading historians including  Dr. Joanne Melish, Dr. Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina, Dr. Richard A. Bailey, Dr. Jared R. Hardesty, and Dr. Thomas Doughton, as well as members of the Deerfield Teachers’ Center and Historic Deerfield, Inc. staff. In addition to lectures and discussions with scholars, the activities include field excursions to other museums of the period interpreting African Americans, including the Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, Massachusetts.

 


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